Enlightened Economics

Economics for an Enlightened Age

Posts Tagged ‘Gerald Celente’

• America’s Economic Rebirth

Posted by Ron Robins on April 12, 2011

By Ron Robins. First published March 24, 2011, in his weekly economics and finance column at alrroya.com

A rebirth of the American spirit and economy is probable. It would be founded on huge reductions of societal debt and consumption. It will arise on re-invigorated American entrepreneurship, a revamped government and healthcare system, new energy sources, local manufacturing and a growing working age population, amongst many other changes Americans will embark on.

However, before America can begin its rebirth, it has to deal with its debts. Total US societal debt may well have reached a tipping point and many investors are wondering when US government bonds will be abandoned. In fact, this process might already be underway. Reuters’ Jennifer Ablan reported on March 9 that Bill Gross’s $237 billion Pimco Total Return Fund, the largest bond fund in the world, had sold all its US government bonds over the past few months.

The most likely cause for wholesale abandonment of US government bonds is when there is broad recognition that the US economic recovery is not self-sustaining—as Bill Gross believes—and that the fiscal stimulus packages and Fed quantitative easing (QE) programmes have been ineffective in righting the US economy. One major result of US bonds being dumped will likely be much higher US interest rates and restrictive credit market conditions. Such conditions could give rise to dramatic falls in consumption as happened in 2008-2009.

In such circumstances, facing a stark new reality, Americans will be forced to look within themselves for guidance. As they do, I believe they will regain their ‘can do’ attitude and surprise the world with a regenerated spirit and incredible enterprise and entrepreneurship. Gerald Celente, probably the most accurate trends forecaster of our time, predicts an ‘American Renaissance.’

More than likely the economic and social circumstances of the next few years will cause a total re-organisation of US governments: federal, state and local. With greatly restrictive finances, many of their services will no longer be available. This will leave room for numerous private entrepreneurs to fill the gaps. Perhaps the area where this will be most felt will be healthcare. As I have written in US Healthcare Delivering a Heart Attack!, financial conditions will force major reductions in Medicare and probably private insurance plan coverage as well. Individuals will have to pay directly for many more services.

With patients in the drivers’ seat by having to pay directly for numerous healthcare services, doctors and healthcare service providers will have to compete in ways they never had imagined before. Alternative therapies such as Chinese medicine, homeopathy, ayurveda, meditation, etc, will compete on a more equal footing with established healthcare practitioners, drug plans, and so on, to provide health remedies. It will be messy and likely finally force down the prices of many healthcare services that had been rising in prices far faster than incomes. Finally, healthcare will become more affordable to Americans. But as in any competitive marketplace, those that offer the most cost-effective services and products will gain most.

There is also the opportunity for eventual US energy self-sufficiency, particularly as many forecasters believe that oil will become ever more expensive—most especially in devalued dollar terms. Renewable energy systems—wind, sun, geothermal, etc —all have the capacity to vastly increase output. An article by Karin Rives on February 18, on the website United States Mission referred to a Bloomberg New Energy Finance report that said US onshore wind power electrical generating costs are now about the same as for coal-generated power. The gradual transfer to electrically driven vehicles is also just beginning.

Furthermore, if environmental safeguards can be found, shale gas deposits in the US could go a long way to ensuring US energy self-sufficiency. In “Facts About Shale Gas”, Washington DC based API states that the US has over 100 years of supply at current gas consumption rates. Moreover, an MIT study reviewed in the New York Times by Matthew L. Ward on June 25, 2010, foresaw natural gas usage doubling over the next several decades to 40 per cent of the US energy market.

Thus, US ingenuity in energy production could substantially change its energy mix. The US could become much more self-reliant while dramatically decreasing its oil related imports that today account for more than 50 to 70 per cent of its trade deficit.

The financial conditions that will befall the world when the US dollar crumbles will probably lead to trade restrictions and tariffs in the US and in many countries. US manufacturing, behind a tariff wall and ‘buy America’ policies, together with a shortage of imported goods, will re-invigorate American manufacturing and technological prowess. Mr Celente predicts an ‘elegance trend’ and the need for durability in all things manufactured.

Similarly, Mr Celente forecasts a rebirth of American agriculture. Americans will demand real, natural food and it will also be grown abundantly in numerous urban and roof gardens.

Looking out over the next few decades, the US has another advantage over other large developed countries. It is expected to have the most favourable demographics as well. By 2050, according to the UN’s 2008 population database projections, the US dependency ratio is forecast to be 63 dependents per 100 working age individuals, compared to 96 for Japan and 74 for Europe.

The next few years will be difficult for America. But beyond that is its revival. Its unsustainable debt burden will be substantially reduced and US governments—federal, state and local—will be financially forced to live within their means. This will entail a huge restructuring of what they do and in the process provide major opportunities for new entrepreneurial activities.

Healthcare, energy, food, manufacturing and technology, will be among the areas that will undergo transformations that will lead America and the world into a new era. A new American spirit probably arising sometime this decade will give rise to the birth of a new US economic paradigm.

Copyright alrroya.com

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• Higher US Savings Is Economic Game Changer

Posted by Ron Robins on December 10, 2010

By Ron Robins. First published September 23, 2010, in his weekly economics and finance column at alrroya.com

There is one prayer of governments and businesses around the world: that Americans forgo higher savings, banish their job and retirement income worries, and go on a spending spree. However, this is not to be. Were the prayer to be fulfilled the global trade and other economic imbalances of the past and present would be unresolved, even magnified. But fortunately, the early stages of their resolution are at hand.

To help resolve these global imbalances, US savings rates must go up while its consumption of goods and services relative to GDP goes down. And this will be a generational game-changer for the US and for the world, causing economic difficulties everywhere for the years ahead.

Depending on how fast its savings rates rise, the US economy will be mired in recessionary or depressionary conditions for some years. But America has faced many daunting economic challenges before and each time it rebirths to greater prosperity. This is likely to be true again.

America once had high savings rates with much lower levels of personal consumption than now. Between, 1950 and 1975, its savings rates were generally in the 8 to12 per cent range of disposable income, and personal consumption relative to GDP averaged around 64 per cent. In the years between 1975 to 2000 savings rates declined significantly to under 5 per cent and then to 1 per cent by 2005 when personal consumption rose to a high of about 72 per cent of GDP.

Since 2006, America’s savings rates have been moving up—and most especially after the 2008 financial crisis. Today, they average about 6 per cent.

Furthermore, it is probable that US savings rates will move even higher to the 10 to 15 per cent range in the next few years as Americans worry about job security, home values, and retirement income. As this happens, US consumption rates will fall back to the 60 per cent region. This will have initially deleterious effects for the global economy and countries reliant on exports for income and jobs. Thus this is another game-changing situation.

No country or countries can presently replace the American consumer. For instance, the combined annual personal consumption of China and India is about $2 trillion, compared to America’s nearly $9 tln.

The big Asian exporters, as well as Germany, will have to find other markets for their products—or stimulate internal consumption to grow. Intra-regional Asian trade is growing rapidly but “is still mainly driven by supply-chain links involving intermediate goods rather than newly surging end-market demand in Asia,” says Stephen Roach, non-executive chairman for Asia at Morgan Stanley, in a Financial Times report.

So where will increased US savings go? As of now they are going mostly into bonds, especially US government bonds. Annual funding needs for the US government over the next few years will probably be close to $2 tln if economic growth stalls or declines. That sum is equal to about 13 per cent of US GDP. It will be increasingly financed from within the US by savers, banks and especially the Federal Reserve (the Fed).

The Fed will create new money to purchase US Treasury debt and probably other assets. This ‘money-printing’ will generate huge amounts of ‘excess’ dollars. The consequences of this action will produce a litany of global economic difficulties. These will include a slumping dollar, domestic inflation—and even possibly hyperinflation.

Upset at the dollar’s fall, other countries and regions from China to Japan to Europe, will attempt to devalue their currencies, leading to probable currency and trade wars. (I have written more on these subjects in previous columns.)

Of course a lower dollar and likely new US import restrictions will mean higher US import prices, or even unavailability of some products. This will give some American manufacturers the opportunity to recoup previously lost domestic markets and the servicing of new ones as well. US industrial production could be re-ignited and even induce foreign companies and manufacturers to buy or invest in US domestic manufacturers as well.

With US imports from oil and computers to foodstuffs, as well as domestically manufactured goods costing more, Americans will find their standard of living declining.

“The need to overcome the effects of reduced [American] individual buying power will lead to the invention of a new class of product which will be a major trend of 2010 and into the future: Technology for The Poor…,” says Gerald Celente, the renowned American trends forecaster and president of the Trends Institute. Continuing, he says that, “growing with the same speed as the Internet Revolution, the trend will be recognised, explored and exploited by legions of skilled but jobless geeks, innovators and inventors who will design and launch a new class of products and services affordable by millions of newly downscaled Western consumers… ”

Mr Celente further forecasts, “a ‘not made in China’ consumer crusade that will spread among developed nations, leading to trade wars and protectionism.”

Americans have little choice but to increase personal savings rates. The Fed will ‘hyperventilate’ to derail prolonged economic malaise and promulgate vast quantities of new dollars, causing the dollar to fall—or crash! A dollar fall will produce inflation; a crash could ignite hyperinflation in the US and elsewhere. Also unleashed could be ‘buy America’ strategies and policies within the US thus further inciting the risk of global currency and trade wars.

This sounds like dire news. However, a new, free America could be born as it rids itself of the shackles of debt. Americans, renowned for their outstanding drive, creativity and innovation, may create a new generation of ingenious products and services geared to the new economic reality. ‘Made in America’ products could again fill retail shelves. And Asia’s export-reliant countries will finally focus on enhancing domestic consumer demand to purchase their wares, thereby bringing much improved living standards to their populations.

Higher US savings will be an economic game-changer for the US and the world.

Copyright alrroya.com

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